May, 2019

Busselton Health Campus’s Emergency Department in shambles

Part of Busselton Health Campus’s Emergency Department blocked off with black tarp. Photo supplied.THE Emergency Department at Busselton Health Campus has been operating at half its capacity due to ongoing maintenance within the hospital, causing mayhem for the campus’s patients and staff.
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A source told the BusseltonMailblack plastic tarp hadbeen draped across the EDwith constructionworkers on one side drilling and cutting, while patients were treated on the other side.

They said ever since the hospital opened in April last year it was rife with defects.

“The first winter that we had, therewere water leaks everywhere,” theysaid.

“Going into this winterwe still have water leaks,we still go round every time it rainsto put towels andwet signs outbecause it leaks everywhere –sometimes out of light fittings.I guess all the ceilings were notup to manufacturer’s standards either, so they are having to reinforce all of the roofs on both levels too.It’s like a construction site.”

Exposed wiring, water pressure, faulty pipework and flooring have also been raised asissues.

The source said staffhad to constantly relocatepatients whilethe ED area and other wings, including the maternity ward, were being fixed.

They said there was very little communication between WA Country Health Services and staff members at the hospital.

“Nobody has ever stood up and said we’ve got problems here, this is what’s going to happen –we just see it pop up. We don’t actually get told what’s going on.”

United Voice (the hospital workers’ union)secretary Carolyn Smithsaid the multitude ofproblems at the hospital was a grave concern for workers and patients.

“People have the right to be safe when in this new hospital,” she said.

“It should nothave been opened with all of these problems to be fixed.

“Not only is it causingdisruptions to patients, but it poses a risk to workers.”

Ms Smith said the Barnett government has been in power for nine years now and theyhad notbeen able to deliver a hospital project that had notbeen plagued with issues from thebeginning.

“Their problem is they try to do things on the cheap and in the quickest timeframe possible inan attempt to get some good press,” she said.

“The closures of these wards will be of significant disadvantage to patients and thecommunity, and likely to drag out patient wait times significantly.”

Newcastle Anglican diocese’s defrocked Dean is still influential, the royal commission has heard

The ‘shadow life’ of Dean Graeme Lawrence Influential: Defrocked Anglican Dean of Newcastle Graeme Lawrence in 1986 in front of Christchurch Cathedral.
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Defrocked: Former Anglican priest Bruce Hoare, allegedly a member of a “gang of three” that protected priest Peter Rushton.

Allegation: Former Newcastle diocese registrar Peter Mitchell alleged to be a member of a “gang of three” that protected Peter Rushton.

Notorious: Hunter child sex offender Anglican priest Peter Rushton.

Convicted: Former Anglican priest Ian Barrick, convicted of sex offences against a boy.

Convicted: Former Newcastle Anglican priest Alan Kitchingman, convicted of child sex offences.

TweetFacebook The Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse is investigating the ‘shadow lives’ of priests Priests pornography hoardFormer altar boy tells of years of abuse by priest CKCI wasn’t told about abuse: bishopTears flow as horrors recountedThe priest who sounded alarmAS IT HAPPENED: Royal Commission day oneAS IT HAPPENED: Royal Commission day twoAS IT HAPPENED: Royal Commission day three​HE was the man who brought Newcastle together in 1989 after an earthquake killed 13 people and severely damaged the Anglican Christchurch Cathedral.

He was the senior Newcastle cleric with a prominent role on the Anglican Church’s sexual abuse working group in 2003 that developed national professionalstandards.

But the 13thAnglicanDean of Newcastle, Graeme Lawrence, was also in a“gang of three” protecting anotorious Hunter paedophile priest, and led a Griffith group of offenders to the Hunterwho were later defrockedafter child sex allegations, the royal commission has heard.

Over the next two weeks the commission will hear evidence Mr Lawrence’s power and influence protected child sex offenders for several decades, but did not end with his defrocking in 2012.

“It is anticipated there will be evidence that Lawrence had, and continues to have, considerable influence in the diocese,” counsel assisting Naomi Sharp told the Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse sitting in Newcastle on Tuesday.

That influence includes an allegation he has continued to preach at Adamstown parish despite the defrocking.

The opening day of the 42ndroyal commission case studyheard shocking evidence of abuse by survivors, but equally shocking evidence of networks supporting Anglican child sex offenders for decades.

Graeme Lawrence was at the centre of a number of those networks, while also taking calls in the late 1990s on the diocese’s child sexual abuse phone line.

Former Newcastle archdeacon, Colvin Ford, will tell the royal commission he believed notorious child sex offender priest Peter Rushton was protected by what he called a “gang of three” –Mr Lawrence, defrocked priest Bruce Hoare and diocesan registrar Peter Mitchell.

Mitchell was convicted in of stealing nearly $200,000 from the diocese and sentenced to 21 months’ jail.

He said the money was taken so that he could live “far too comfortably”.

The then Anglican Bishop of Newcastle Roger Herft told the Newcastle Herald “we are all very sad” about what happened.

“He (Mitchell) has been a close friend and a significant part of diocesan life,”he said.

“We have been praying for him.”

Former professional standards board president Colin Elliott will give evidence there was a “cohort of Newcastle Cathedral practitioners who appear, unquestionably to have supported Graeme Lawrence”.

Mr Lawrence lived at the Christchurch Cathedral deanery with his partner Greg Goyette, while Mr Hoare lived at the canon’s residence at the cathedral.

From the 1980s to the 1990s Mr Lawrence, Peter Rushton and Bruce Hoare were part of the leadership team in the diocese, and were members of the diocesecommittee that considered child sex allegations against priests.

The royal commission will hear evidence Mr Lawrence, who arrived in Newcastle from Griffith from 1984, was one of a group of four trainee priests at St John’s Theological College at Morpeth in 1963 who went on to be accused, or convicted, of child sex offences.

The royal commission was told former Newcastle Bishop Brian Farran was also at the college in 1963.

In the next two weeks former Newcastle Bishop, and now Archbishop, Roger Herft, and former Sydney Archbishop Harry Goodhew will give evidence about an allegation made in 1996 that Lawrence sexually abused children.

“This allegation was raised with the then Archbishop of Sydney, Harry Goodhew,” Ms Sharp told the royal commission.

“He in turn raised it with Bishop Herft. A filenote suggests that Lawrence denied the allegation to Bishop Herft. Bishop Herft and Bishop Goodhew will be asked about this matter.”

Mr Lawrence provided references to three Anglican priests, including Alan Kitchingman and Ian Barrick, after they were convicted of child sex offences.

The royal commission will hear evidence of Mr Lawrence’s early association with Anglican priests Andrew Duncan, Bruce Hoare andGraham Sturt in Griffith, and the move of the four men to the Hunter.

The royal commission will hear evidence about child sex allegations against the four, and Mr Lawrence’s partner Greg Goyette, which were the subject of professional standards hearings in Newcastle in 2010, that led to the priests’ defrocking, and orders that Mr Goyette can never hold a position in the church.

The evidence will include that Mr Lawrence groomed and sexually abused a 16-year-old boy in 1981, after Anglican priest Andrew Duncan told him that Mr Lawrence was “part of the family”.

In 2015 Newcastle Bishop Greg Thompson issued an historic apology to child sexual abuse victims in the Hunter, and said the diocese believed more than 30 child sex offenders had abused children for decades.

Bishop Thompson said the culture of abuse within the diocese had to change so that “mates” weren’t looking after “mates” anymore.

‘‘Some of our photos of clergy on the walls are going to be difficult to hang on the walls after the royal commission,’’ he said in June 2015.

‘‘What is being revealed is the shadow lives of some.

‘‘They had this sense of self-entitlement that meant they had sexual relations with children as if that was a part of the role.’’

The most liveable suburbs in Sydney’s west

FULL LIST: 555 suburb ranked by liveabilityWhat is liveability? The 16 indicators that make (or break) a neighbourhoodBuying a home in Sydney’s least liveable suburbs a ‘no-brainer’Comment: The key to winning the west is employment
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Sydney’s most liveable areas are predominantly in the east but there are some western suburbs bucking the trend, a new study shows.

Parramatta’s emergence as Sydney’s second CBD has been a game changer for liveability in the western suburbs and its surrounding suburbs ranked relatively according to the Domain Liveable Sydney 2016 study, authored by Tract Consultants and Deloitte Access Economics.

The top ranking suburb in the west was Harris Park, which was the 63rd most liveable area, followed by Parramatta at 110 and Rosehill at 187.

The growing Parramatta hub has fostered cultural activities in the local area and introduced new restaurants and cafes, Western Sydney resident and executive officer for non-profit western Sydney research house WESTIR, Peter Rogers, said.

“It’s multicultural and there are real hidden gems in the west,” Mr Rogers said, noting the popular Parramasala festival and regular Riverside events.

“It’s a lost area for a great swathe of those in the city.

“Those in the east and inner west don’t realise all the exciting things happening in the west.”

These exciting things included the move of the Powerhouse into Parramatta, as well as the existing cultural activities.

Suburbs around Parramatta ranked highly in the study for culture, telecommunications, local employment, cafes, retail, restaurants, ferry access and education.

But notably, they fell short on harbour views, tree cover, crime, open space and congestion.

The train links allowing access into the CBD for commuters is also a big drawcard to the mid-west suburbs, Century 21 Community First principal Rafi Younes said.

“This all comes at an affordable price. If you wanted a property that was so central and accessible in areas such as Bondi, it would be much more expensive in price and in terms of the cost of living compared to Parramatta and Harris Park,” he said.

And this doesn’t come as a sacrifice to capital growth. A Harris Park family home Mr Younes sold in 2011 for $295,000 recently sold for about $600,000.

“I believe these areas will remain appealing due to this combination of lifestyle, ease of access and great value for money,” he said.

The emergence of more high-rise apartment developments in these areas, with 16 more projects on their way and about 40 lodged at council waiting for approval, will also change the area, Just Think Real Estate director Edwin Almeida said.

But he warned the construction of dual purpose development, with commercial on the ground floor and residential apartments above, could cause a vacancy issue and there was a concern about taking away “the carpark areas and tightening road parking in the streets up to North and West Parramatta residential area”. See how your region fares:City and EastUpper North ShoreInner WestNorthern Beaches

Further out west, Penrith secured a spot in the top 200 suburbs of the 555 on the list and is expected to rank more highly in future, Cohen Handler associate Felix Taing said.

“With major upgrades to Penrith Lake on the table – there’s currently a draft plan to fill up the old quarry – this will see new apartments pop up near the lake, fostering a new community.”

And across the entire western region, parklands and communal areas have been a focus in the past three to four years, he said.

“Prior to these changes, the standard of living in the western suburbs was not great – roads were not being fixed, and there were not enough community areas,” Mt Taing said.

“With the second airport slated for Badgerys Creek, we’ll soon see Penrith become another CBD, which means there’ll be a dramatic increase in price around the western and south-west suburbs.”

The one thing more important to unit buyers than location

Noise, not location, is now the most important factor for first home buyers looking at apartments, according to strata leaders.
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Loud parties, barking dogs, flushing toilets and excessively vocal “intimate time”, were named as the most complained about issues for strata residents by Queensland body corporate managers, Archers the Strata Professionals.

And now they are pushing the importance of strata noise awareness.

Archers partner Grant Mifsud said noise issues have become top priority for first-time apartment buyers.

“One of the most common issues we deal with is noise complaints, particularly from those living in inner-city hubs,” Mr Mifsud said.

“It’s essential to view the property at different times of day to detect common noises you wouldn’t typically hear upon first inspection.

“We’ve had people purchase an apartment above a railway, and then complain about the noise from the railway. It’s common to dismiss a noise after hearing it once, however when you hear it every day, multiple times, it’s a very different story.”

Now some inner city Brisbane first home buyers are choosing apartments based on noise levels – not location.

Eloise McNee, 24, is on the hunt for a Brisbane apartment, and said location was not a deciding factor.

“I have looked at close to 30 places and location definitely isn’t everything,” Ms McNee said.

“Things like noise and whether I can resell the property in five or 10 years is more important to me.”

She recently put an offer on a Gaythorne apartment after being deterred from other suburbs.

“The place I’ve put an offer on doesn’t have any noise and backs onto a creek,” she said.

Ms McNee said she was turned off another otherwise “lovely” property due to the road noise.

“Everything else was really good about the apartment, but the loud traffic was a deal breaker,” she said.

“I didn’t look at areas like West End because it’s so apartment heavy and it’s almost over-saturated. So, I looked an more established suburbs with less apartments .” Listening out for noise problems

Allen Wargent buyers’ agent Pete Wargent said unexpected noises comes “part and parcel” with high density living.

“Noise is an area that definitely needs key consideration when buying in strata complexes,” Mr Wargent said.

“One way to reduce chances of noise is to purchase a boutique apartment, where you would have less common walls than say in a high rise.”

He said independent research was vital.

“A sales agent isn’t going to highlight the downsides of the property, so doing your own research is important. That could be driving by on weekends to see the area’s nightlife, or if possible renting close by for six months prior to buying,” Mr Wargent said.

“But you can’t always know what neighbours you will get. And if you do end up having problems with noise, communication with the neighbours and awareness of strata rules is essential to getting by.”

Daniel Cohen, co-founder of new homeowner advocates group First Home Buyers Australia, said new property owners are becoming more aware of the areas they buy into.

“In the past buyers may have looked at a good location and assume it was the right area for them, but now they are more forward-thinking, looking at what the area will be like into the future,” Mr Cohen said.

Mr Cohen advises first home buyers to look closely at developing suburbs as a source of increased noise.

“As everyone knows, more construction means more noise, so it’s important to be aware of that if you buy into an early development where there is rezoning for more.

“And then when the development is finished, there will of course be more people, more traffic and generally busier.”

Postie Bike Nationals 2016

REVVED UP: Rutherford motorbike mechanic Ross Nearpass kicks up some dirt on his modified postie bike. Mr Nearpass will join hundreds of other fans of the cult-classic bike at the Postie Bike Nationals. Picture: PERRY DUFFINAside from fairy-bread, Vegemite and the hills-hoist, there are few objects that typify suburban Australia like the humble postie bike.
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Maitland will again host the World’sbiggest celebration of the iconic bike when hundreds of modified, customised and restored Honda CT110s roll into town for the Postie Bike Nationals from September 9 to 11.

Organiser Warrick Penfold founded Postie Bikes Australiaand held the first Nationalsin 2014.

“They’re the biggest selling motorbike in Australia in the last ten years and everybody, absolutely everybody in Australia knows what a postie bike is,” he said.

Since then, thanks in part to the cult-like popularityof the bike, a strong community of Hunter riders anda savvy social media presence, Mr Penfold has watched the gathering grow bigger every year.

The Postie Bike Nationals are back | PHOTOS Action from the heats of the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Action from the heats of the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Action from the heats of the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Action from the heats of the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Action from the heats of the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Action from the heats of the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Action from the heats of the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Action from the heats of the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Action from the heats of the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

Action from the heats of the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

The Cessnock City RSL Pipes and Drums Band perfromed at the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Krystal Sellars.

The grid girls at the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Riders approach the start line of the final of the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Riders approach the start line of the final of the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Riders approach the start line of the final of the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Riders approach the start line of the final of the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Riders approach the start line of the final of the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Riders approach the start line of the final of the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Mark Bracks interviews the riders at the start line of the final of the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Riders approach the start line of the final of the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Large crowds turned out for the final of the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Large crowds turned out for the final of the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Tara Naysmith sang the national anthem before the final of the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Tara Naysmith sang the national anthem before the final of the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Commentators Zak Caban and Mark Bracks before the final of the Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Amy Watson, Courtney Stacey and Rebecca Stacey at the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Katie Lanzafame, Jackie Lanzafame, Jenny Lanzafame, Craig Jones, Len Lanzafame and Jill Herbert at the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Hayden Stafford, Caylan Law, Koa Payne, Archie Law, Hudson Law and Nate Payne Tara Naysmith at the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Scott Jenkinson and Adam Edwards at the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Claudia Dalton, Jennifer Cartwright and Demi Dalton at the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix in Cessnock; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Mark Bracks and Scott Harris of Cessnock Mitsubishi at the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix presentation at Peden’s Hotel; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Commentator Mark Bracks at the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix presentation at Peden’s Hotel; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Commentator Mark Bracks and third place riders Justin Girotto and Richie Nowland at the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix presentation at Peden’s Hotel; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Commentator Mark Bracks with second place rider Paul Caslick at the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix presentation at Peden’s Hotel; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix presentation at Peden’s Hotel; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

Commentator Mark Bracks and winners Marty McNamara and Luke Richards at the Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix presentation at Peden’s Hotel; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix presentation at Peden’s Hotel; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix presentation at Peden’s Hotel; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix presentation at Peden’s Hotel; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix presentation at Peden’s Hotel; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix presentation at Peden’s Hotel; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix presentation at Peden’s Hotel; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

The Cessnock Mitsubishi Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix presentation at Peden’s Hotel; November 1, 2015. Photo by Sage Swinton.

TweetFacebook Fanatics of the postie bike: Cessnock’s 2015 Australian Postie Bike Grand Prix Pictures: KRYSTAL SELLARS“Hand on heart, I reckon we’ll see more than 150 [riders] this year,” he said.

He’s already recieved entries from Western Australia, South Australia, Victoria, Queensland and from across NSW.

But Mr Penfold said the event is more than just a gathering–it’s a series ofevents designed to test the might, skill and endurance of rider and machine.

“The whole weekend is a celebration of postie bikes,” he said.

It will start with a horsepower ‘shoot-out’, postie-bike cruises around the Hunter Valley, a wheelie competition, a show and shine, postie bike soccer, tech-talks, a 24-hour bike buildand a cook-off where riders must cook a meal using the engine of their bike.

“The guy who won it last year actually holds the record for going across Australia in fiveand-a-half days on a postie bike,” Mr Penfold said.

“He cooked a lamb spit-roast. I got second, prawns. It’s all just a bit of fun”

The Postie Bike Nationalsis largely designed for bike owners to enter and be a part of, though the general public will have a chance to peek inside the cult of the postie bike on Saturday afternoon.

For more information, updates and ticketsfollowPostie Bikes Australia Nationals 2016 on Facebook.

Having a blast at the Charters Towers Show | Photos

Charters Towers’ Kelly Jones and Joan Barrett from Sellheim with Nancy who won six ribbons at the show including Reserve Champion Harness Horse/Pony and the fully restored 1930s wagon that was used in the show.Visitors of all ages made a beeline for the 135th Charters Towers Show held from July 31 to August 2 to enjoy a great time outwith family and friends.
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The monster truck showcase, steel wall car stunt, chainsaw carving demonstration and Five Star Fireworks Spectacularall proved to be big hits with show-goers.

Having a blast at the Charters Towers Show | Photos Rides, showbags, sweet treats and all the other showtime delights kept kids and the young at heart entertained over the course of the event.

Julie Taylor from Burrum Heads and Lynn Klupfel from Tiaro kept their sister and Charters Towers mayor Liz Schmidt company during the show.

ATV enthusiast Corbyn Bujayer from Charters Towers was in his element ripping around the track while mum Tracey Nielsen watched on.

Creative chainsaw carver Matt George from Maleny was a hit with show visitors during his demonstrations. Mr George’s work can be seen all across the north at universities, war monuments and shows.

Katrina Alexander-Smith from KP Performance Horses Townsville on Majestic who won Reserve Champion Hunter Hack.

Charters Towers girls Billie Scott, Bronwyn Pedracini, Shannon Scott and Poppy Prichard having a ball at the show.

Cassandra and Bernadette Easton from Charters Towers inspect the caged birds exhibit. Bernadette later led the grand parade on Darma Acres Amaretto.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services volunteers Jordan Rafter, Alexia Langsdorf and Lachlan Niebling flying the flag for the organisation during the show.

Jenny and Graeme Fry from Brisbane had a great time catching up with Blackheath and Thornburgh College principal Nigel Fairbairn.

Charters Towers’ Kelly Jones and Joan Barrett from Sellheim with Nancy who won six ribbons at the show including Reserve Champion Harness Horse/Pony and the fully restored 1930s wagon that was used in the show.

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