July, 2018

Fear just breeds distrust in youth

FEAR BREEDS FEAR: Muslims pray in Auburn at the end of Ramadan.Authors George Morgan and Scott Poynting have noted that in the West, including Australia, in the last 20years or so ‘the racialised Muslim Other’ has become the pre-eminent ‘folk devil of our time’.
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This process did not start with the events of 9/11, but since then has increased rapidly, for instance, with the anxiety over the Iraq war and with the moral panic over the ‘Lebanese gang rape’ affair in Sydney.

In Australia, the majority of Muslims are from Arabic-speaking background (descendants of mostly Lebanese immigrants though this is slowly changing because Australian-born Muslims are fast growing), but there are many other Muslims from different ethnic and national origins.

But the predominant media and political discourses lump Muslims in a single category and represent them as threatening to ‘our way of life’. As a single category then, Muslims are constantly targeted for media and political propaganda, repeatedly linked to terrorism, perceived as an encroaching Islamist threat, identified as enemies of the state, and openly demonised.

For example, in 2005 the incumbent Prime Minister John Howard opened up a summit in which he noted: “There are a number of people in our community who are a danger to all of us, not many but some, and we have an obligation to try and identify them, to neutralise them, to prevent them influencing others, particularly the young, and in the process learn from the experience of working together effectively as Australians. But my starting point is that we come together as Australians with an overriding loyalty to the future of this country and to nothing else and that we will work together as Australians with that overriding loyalty to try and prevent problems that have occurred in other countries.”

Around the same time in The Australian, a national newspaper, Andrew Jakubowicz,a Professor of Sociology at the University of Technology Sydney,observedthat the following was noted about the then Deputy Prime Minister Peter Costello who suggested: “Ifyou don’t like those values, then don’t come here. Australia is not for you. . . . This is the way I look at it: Australia is a secular society, with parliamentary law, part of the Western tradition of individual rights.”

Political discourse and media accounts of Muslims racialised along these lines create the perception that many Muslims are using the security of liberal democratic freedom to undermine liberal democracy. The familiar moral panic is spread and othering is intensified. Aharsh approach is recommended andthe state is expected to respond swiftly and firmly, and to maintain a culture of surveillance.

While the experience of Islamophobia generates feelings of harm and disrespect, there are more practical consequences for Australian Muslims, particularly young Muslims who are locally born and who expect their citizenship rights to be honoured.

Patterns of discomfort and fear, distrust and exclusion amongst Australian Muslims emphasise in a general sense that their whole way of life is not only devalued, but not to be accommodated.

The pervasive sense of Islamophobia creates for Australian Muslims generally, and young Muslim Australians in particular, discomfort and fear that affects their sense of belonging both to the nation and to their neighbourhoods and everyday life.

Riaz Hassan using 2006 census data found that Muslim men were more likely than non-Muslim men to possess university qualification (21 per cent and 15 per cent respectively), however their rates of unemployment were two to four times higher (depending on age).

Unemployment leaves young Australian Muslims with considerable free time which they may utilise unproductively and potentially makes them vulnerable to social ills including exposure to the ideology of radical political Islam. Thus Islamophobia potentially also fuels social agitation and violence.

Dr Jan A. Ali,Senior Lecturer in Islam and Modernity,Western Sydney UniversityThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

The never-ending question for family

The torment for the family of a missing person must be immense.
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It is something that only those who have a loved one who can’t be found could understand.

For many of us, we are reminded of this during events like Missing Person’s Week. But for them it is part of daily life.

Missing man Nicola Sallese, last seen in 2008.

It can be days, weeks, months or evenyears.

For some they never receive that answer about what has happened to that special person in their life.

The Coast has a number of well-publicised cases of people who have disappeared.

These range from the recent disappearance of Penguin mother and grandmother Angela Jeffrey, the mystery around young Burnie mother Helen Munnings andthecase of Paradise grandfather Nicola Sallese.

The public reaction to Mrs Jeffrey’s disappearance was overwhelming, with many turning out to help with a search of the Baker’s Beach andNarawntapu National Park areas over a number of days.

They helped to supplement the resources of Police and SES, who were stretched with flood events across the Coast.

Despite the efforts, any sign of Mrs Jeffrey is yet to be found.

For the family of Mr Sallese, they still keep up the search for their father, despite a coroner’s ruling in 2012 presuming he had died.

His son Nick has told of the heartache and loss of a loving father, full of life and very social.

Despite the coronial decision, which allowed the estate of Mr Sallese to be settled, it provided little comfort to the family.

They still hold out hope that one day they will find out what has happened to their treasured father and grandfather.

In Tasmania each year about 125 people are reported missing.Thankfully, most of those are located within 48 hours.

Coordinator for Tasmania Police, Senior Constable Beth Schiwy says that missing person cases are never closed, and any new information is always investigated.

“When someonegoes missing many people are affected: family, friends, colleagues and communities. Not knowing what happened to someone can be devastating for them,” she said.

In Tasmania, because of our tight-knit communities, it is particularly noticeable when someone doesn’t come home. We can only hope for more answers for those waiting.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

GALLERYBig Day In draws massive crowds

GALLERY | Big Day In draws massive crowds TweetFacebookThe Voice winner Alfie Arcuriand cover band act ‘Original Sin’ INXS Show.
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Wollondilly mayor Simon Landow said the day achieved what the council and the organisers set out to do–attract families to the area.

“It was great to see a large amount of families.There were people from Wollongong and wider Macarthur,” he said.

Event organiser and BD Productions owner Leigh Achis said the day was a great success.

“It was amazing to seeso many people support Wollondilly by comingto the event,” he said.

Shannon Noll told theAdvertiserthat he had a great time performing.

“The event is fora good cause andit makes you feel good to think that you are helping a little bit.I get so much support from my fans so it is good to giveback,” he said.

Alfie Arcurisaid it was great to perform at the event and to see a large turn out.

“Throughout my experience on The Voice I was aware of the local support but it is hard to say thank you to everyone so performing at the festival is a nice way to give back and to help the storm-affected residents,” he said.“Macarthuris a good community–people always come together when bad things happen.”

Cr Landow said thestall holdershad a successful day and it seemed like families enjoyed the amusement rides and car show.

He said families had a relaxed afternoon listening to musicon a perfect winter’s sunny day.

All proceeds from the day will go into the mayoral relief fund.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Footy’s growing popularity on showphotos

RUCKWOMEN: Gaby Allen, 11, from Merrivale Primary School and Julia Kelly, 12, from Our Lady Help Of Christians contest a ball-up on Tuesday. Pictures: Vicky Hughson
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THE juggernaut of female footy was on display at St Joseph’s Primary School as Grade 5/6 students from Warrnambool and Ballarat competed in an inter-school competition on Tuesday.

Footy’s growing popularity on show | photos Primary School kids in a AFL competition at St Josephs Primary School. Pictured Gaby Allen, 11, from Merrivale Primary School and Julia Kelly, 12, from Our Lady Help Of Christians. Picture: Vicky Hughson

Primary School kids in a AFL competition at St Josephs Primary School. Pictured Maggie Bath, 11, from Merrivale Primary School, Namojwok Naborng, 10, from Our Lady Help Of Christians and Amber Smith, 11, from Merrivale Primary School. Picture: Vicky Hughson

Primary School kids in a AFL competition at St Josephs Primary School. Pictured Lucy Elhage, 12, from Our Lady Help Of Christians Primary School. Picture: Vicky Hughson

Primary School kids in a AFL competition at St Josephs Primary School. Pictured Alexandra Rea, 12, from Our Lady Help Of Christians Primary School. Picture: Vicky Hughson

Primary School kids in a AFL competition at St Josephs Primary School. Pictured Taya Irving,11, from Our Lady Help Of Christians Primary School. Picture: Vicky Hughson

Primary School kids in a AFL competition at St Josephs Primary School. Pictured Erin Russell, 12, from Our Lady Help Of Christians Primary School. Picture: Vicky Hughson

Primary School kids in a AFL competition at St Josephs Primary School. Pictured Millie McConnell, 12, Taya Irving, 11, and Mayley Cross, 11, from Our Lady Help Of Christians Primary School. Picture: Vicky Hughson

Primary School kids in a AFL competition at St Josephs Primary School. Pictured Millie McConnell, 12, from Our Lady Help Of Christians. Picture: Vicky Hughson

Primary School kids in a AFL competition at St Josephs Primary School. Pictured Nikayla Russell, 13, from Our Lady Help Of Christians and Gaby Allen, 11, from Merrivale Primary School. Picture: Vicky Hughson

Primary School kids in a AFL competition at St Josephs Primary School. Pictured Alexandra Rea, 12, from Our Lady Help Of Chritians Primary School and Amber Smith, 11, from Merrivale Primary School. Picture: Vicky Hughson

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GALLERYBig Day In draws massive crowds

GALLERY | Big Day In draws massive crowds TweetFacebookThe Voice winner Alfie Arcuriand cover band act ‘Original Sin’ INXS Show.
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Wollondilly mayor Simon Landow said the day achieved what the council and the organisers set out to do–attract families to the area.

“It was great to see a large amount of families.There were people from Wollongong and wider Macarthur,” he said.

Event organiser and BD Productions owner Leigh Achis said the day was a great success.

“It was amazing to seeso many people support Wollondilly by comingto the event,” he said.

Shannon Noll told theAdvertiserthat he had a great time performing.

“The event is fora good cause andit makes you feel good to think that you are helping a little bit.I get so much support from my fans so it is good to giveback,” he said.

Alfie Arcurisaid it was great to perform at the event and to see a large turn out.

“Throughout my experience on The Voice I was aware of the local support but it is hard to say thank you to everyone so performing at the festival is a nice way to give back and to help the storm-affected residents,” he said.“Macarthuris a good community–people always come together when bad things happen.”

Cr Landow said thestall holdershad a successful day and it seemed like families enjoyed the amusement rides and car show.

He said families had a relaxed afternoon listening to musicon a perfect winter’s sunny day.

All proceeds from the day will go into the mayoral relief fund.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Built with space in mind

ROOM TO MOVE: One of three living areas at 3 Ash Place which is open for inspection on Saturday. PERFECT FOR A FAMILY: The front facade of 3 Ash Place, with its established, but easy care gardens.
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WHEN 3Ash Place was listed for sale, Sarah Dwyer from Bathurst Real Estate knew it was a property that would be sought after.

“With it’s prime cul-de-sac location, immaculate presentation and three open plan, north facing, living areas it’s the perfect family home,” she said.

FUNCTIONAL KITCHEN: The blackwood kitchen has quality stainless steel appliances and a functional design.

Nestled amongan established garden, this home boasts true privacy with room to run or relax in the vine covered patio.

The kitchen boasts electric cooktop, wall oven, dishwasher and pantry. There are four / fivebedrooms all with built-ins (main with large walk-in and ensuite), terrific storage throughout, ducted gas heating, rear yard access the list goes on an on.

RELAX HERE: The property boasts established gardens, as can be seen at the rear of the house.

Ms Dwyer said one of the main selling points of this property is it’s size and location.

“The moment you walk in it’s just gorgeous.

BUILT FOR ENJOYMENT: Another of the living rooms at 3 Ash Place. The property is open for inspection on Saturday, through Bathurst Real Estate.

“The three living areas are enormous, and being in a cul-de-sac, there is no through traffic, it’s a quiet peaceful lifestyle.

“The gardens while established are very low maintenance.

“All the five bedrooms have built ins, and all are very generously sized; four of the bedrooms can easily accommodate a queen sized bed, the fifth would fit a single bed.

“There are two bathrooms, main with separate toiletand ensuite off the main bedroom.”

Ms Dwyer said everything about the house makes it perfect fora family.

“When this property was designed it was built with space in mind.

“Even the garage is spacious with room for two cars plus a workshop.

“It’s an ideal house for a family given it’sspace and location.”

Ms Dwyer said the kitchen is equally impressive withblackwood timber as well asall stainless steel appliances.

And there is also sideaccess to the property, plus room for a shed if you need it.

“There’s so much space, there is room for everyone to move, and the design of the house just works, everything flows, it really is a smart design.

And then there is the location.

“There’s a foot path straight to the Trinity Height Shopping Centre, it’s an easy 10 minute walk and you have everything at your fingertips, a supermarket, doctor’s surgery, newsagent and bakery even achemist and take away.”

Ms Dwyer urged anyone interested in looking for space to move to come and have a look for themselves.

“It really is worth it,” she said.

“There is an open house on this Saturday, from 1pm until 1.30pm, so it’s a perfect opportunity to come and see the property first hand.

“Iwill be there so if you’re looking for that perfect property keep Saturday free,” Ms Dwyer said.

Selling agent Sarah DwyerThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Victims get safe house

FIGHT FOR SURVIVAL: DVINA Chief Executive Officer Melissa McInerney at the new safe house set to open over the next week. Photo: Peri Strathearn.
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A safe house for domestic violence sufferers is coming to the Murraylands to offer hope to survivors of abuse.

Donated by a generous local to volunteergroup Domestic Violence is Never Acceptable (DVINA), the house has been established forthose who are afraid to speak up, whowalk on egg shells, andhave no family orfriends to understand or listen.

It was donated in memory of those forgotten, in the interest of saving “the manywholive infear”.

DVINA Chief Executive Officer Melissa McInerney felt the safe house was the first of its kind for DVINA nationwide anda step towards a safer Murraylands.

“Victims don’t choose to live in violence and fear, many have no option but to stay and this DVINA safe house will give them the courage to leave andthe strength to live to see a safer tomorrow,” she said.

A survivor herself, Melissa wanted DVINA to offer understanding to the “silenced” without judgement.

“Ending an important relationship is never easy. It’s even harder when you’ve been isolated from your family and friends, psychologically beaten down, financially controlled, and physically threatened,” she said.

During their stay, guests will be supported with financial guidance, group therapy sessions,amental health worker andtherapeutic gardening classes to assist them in transitioning into a safer life in the future.

For Melissa, maintaining security was paramount.

“Clients sign anagreement stating they will keep the safe house as a secret location and they won’t be able to tell family orfriendsthe location as it will putothers in hiding in jeopardy,” she said.

“Any outside contact will be made away from the DVINAsafe house.”

The safe house will be securelyfenced and their will be a phone with DVINA contacts,ACCare,SAPOL, emergency services, headspace and local medical services.

She urged victims to have the courage to take control back over their lives and utilise the safe house.

“If you’re decidingwhether to stay or leave, you may be confused, uncertain, frightened, and torn,” she said.

“Do not be trapped by confusion, guilt, or self-blame; the only thing that matters is your safety.”

She namedbusinessesand anonymousmembers of the local community,“DVINA angels”for their donations.

The house is expected to be ready over the next week.

For more information orDVINA support, head to theirfacebook page: 梧桐夜网facebook南京夜网/DomesticViolenceIs NeverAcceptable/This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Socceroos duo to coach Magpies

EXPERIENCED: Newly appointed coach Dean Heffernan will play a vital role in directing the Maitland Magpies strategy in the 2016 finals.FORMER Socceroos Dean Heffernan and Matt Thompson will play on next year at Maitland while taking on thecoaching duties at the Northern NSW National Premier League club.
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Heffernan, who came to the Magpies this season, is completing the required B-licence coaching course and has agreed to take the reins in 2017.

Thompson, now in his second year at Maitland, is at the C-licence level and will be an assistant along with Reece Thompson.

The Magpies parted ways with Steve Piggottlast month, two thirds through his return season in charge. Technical director Rod Haggarty wasappointed coach for the rest of thisseason although the 2017 appointments have alreadytaken a hands-on role this campaign.

Thompson said he jumped at the opportunity to coach with Heffernan, who had a vast experience in Australia and overseas as a player.

“We’re good mates and I’m really looking forward to it.,” he said.

“I could never imagine myself out of the game, whether it’sas a player or coach. I think with my experience over the years I can bring a lot to the job.”

Thompson said both he and Heffernan’s main focus was the next two rounds before the finals.

“To go from playing the last five matches last year to stave off relegation to now being guaranteed a spot in the finals is a real credit to the club,” he said.

“We hope to win the next two games, but just as importantly it’s a chance to look at Edgeworth and Magic’s games and how we can break them down come the finals.”

FOCUSED: Former Socceroo Matt Thompson joins good mate and fellow Socceroo Dean Heffernan at the helm of the Maitland Magpies in 2017.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Don’t panic, the Rio Olympics will be fine

I’ll admit it right from the outset, I’m an Olympics tragic.The prospect of the world’s best athletes descending on Rio deJaneiro for the world’s biggest sporting event is always going to be a tantalising prospect, and any chance to see Australians compete for gold is always a good one.
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From the moment the Opening Ceremony gets under way, I will happily spend the next two weeks watching whatever sport is broadcast onTV.

Everyone will have their favourite sport over the two weeks of the Games, but for the other three years and 50 weeks the Olympics aren’t on, a new favourite sport emerges: Olympic bashing.

Going off the coverage in the lead-up to the Rio Olympics you would think the world’s athletes are walking into a death trap, a security nightmare, chaos or a combination of all three.

Some are already labeling Rio as the worst Olympics ever.

Whether it’s the Zika virus, threats to security, the state of the athletes village, crime rates in Rio or the state of the water, media have beenfocusing on a litany of concerns in the lead-up, rather than the chances of Aussie medal hopefuls.

But while the problems facing Rio are many and threaten the reputation of the Games, this situation is not a new one.

Every four years the host city is plagued with issues in the lead-up to the Games, only for them to beforgotten about once the Olympics begin and the Games go on to be a great success.

London 2012 was plagued with security issues and cost blow out. In the lead up to the 2008 Olympics Beijing was crippled with fears of pollution and human rights abuse in Tibet. People had concerns before Athens about ticket sales and sweltering conditions. Moscow and Los Angeles had boycotts from several nations at the height of the Cold War.

Not even Sydney 2000 was immune, with concerns about Australia’s treatment of Indigenous Australians or kicking homeless off the streets for the Games.

The point being, that regardless of the problems in the lead-up to the Olympics and the growing negativity, the Games always turn out to be a success, uniting people from across the world together through sport, regardless of race, religion or country.

And at a time when there’s so much negativity in the world, we need the Olympics more than ever.

Andrew Brown is a Fairfax Media journalistThis story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Youth help out shire’s young mums

HELP: Eurobodalla Youth Committee members with Moruya Hospital midwife and pregnancy support coordinator Clare Burke, presenting resources to support mums.
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Young parents will benefit from a group of youth’s latest project.

Eurobodalla’s youth committee has funded new training resources to help young mums.

The committee presented the resources to Moruya Hospital midwife and adolescent pregnancy support coordinator Clare Burke last week.

In Eurobodalla, the percentage of mothers who are teenagers has remained steady at around seven per cent over the last decade, against a decreasing NSW average of 2.7 per cent in 2014.

Youth committee members identified this as an area of focus and contacted Moruya Hospital to see how they could help.

Ms Burke runs support workshops for pregnant adolescents and needed teaching resources.

Offered a $600 budget from Eurobodalla Council’s Youth Services, Ms Burke, a registered midwife, chose the resources she required and enjoyed demonstrating their use to youth committee members when she dropped by their meeting last Thursday.

It was a busy week for Youth Committee, who also hosted a trivia night at Moruya Bowling Club on Saturday night.

The event raised $2336 for youth homelessness services in the Eurobodalla.

With 42 per cent of the homeless population aged under 25, the committee wants to shine a light on this issue locally.

Their next event to raise awareness about youth homelessness is a sleep out on Friday, August 26 on the Council Chambers forecourt.

The Youth Committee has up to four members from years 8-12 of each of the five high schools in the Eurobodalla Shire.

They are an advisory committee giving input from young people into council plans, strategies and operations.

Members of the committee also participate in leadership development, civic events and plan activities and projects that benefit the young people of Eurobodalla and the region.

The youth committee’s next meeting is on August 24 in Moruya.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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